Take a look at the variables in this data frame…

What kind of variable is GDP and population?
# What about Total?
# To examine the relationship between these three variables,
# we could consider making a scatter plot of GDP against pop
# and use plotting symbols that are proportional in size to
# the number of medals.
# To begin, make a plot of GDP against population.
# Which of the three principles of good graphics does this
# plot violate and why?
#Q7. Let’s examine GDP per person (create this new varialbe your self)
# and population. Use a log scale for both axes. Use the symbols()
# function rather than plot(), and create circles for the plotting
# symbols where the area of the circle is proportional to the
# total number of medals.
# Q8. It appears that the countries with no medals are circles too.
# Remake the plot, this time using only the countries that won
# medals. Then add the non-medal countries to the plot using the “.” plotting
# character.
# Q9. Make the plot information rich by adding axis labels,
# title, and label at least 5 of the more interesting points
# with the country name. Use text() to do this.
# PRINT A COPY OF THIS PLOT TO TURN IN.
######################################
# PLOT 3.
# Plotting points on maps can help us see geographic relationships
#
#Q10. Install the maps library and load it into your R session.
# Make a map of thw world where the countries are filled with a light grey color.
#Q11. Use the symbols() function to add circles to the map where
# the circles are proportional in area to the number of medals
# won by the country. You may find the add parameter useful.
# (Be sure to NOT plot circles for countries with 0 medals).
#Q12. Remake the plot and fill in the circles with a partially
# transparent gold color. To create this color:
# install the RColorBrewer library and load it into R;
# call display.brewer.all() to examine the palettes;
# choose a palette and ask for the names of a few colors
# using brewer.pal();
# pick one of the colors and create a new one that is transparent
# by adding two more digits to the end of the name, e.g.,
# if you want to use “#FEB24C” then make it transparent with
# e.g. myColor = “#FEB24CAA” or “#FEB24C88”

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